KAM Chats: What’s next?



This week I continue our conversation with Tom and turn the conversation to what we want to do with our careers.

Korean Elections



June 4th is the next Korean election, so we’ve now entered into the two week period where candidates and their supports got out en masse to get the vote out. One of the things I think is pretty good about Korean elections is that each candidate is assigned a number (1, 2, etc.). That number denotes where they appear on the ballot. Here’s a quick example of how campaigning for Korean elections look this year.

Changes!



Changes, they are happening. This spring I started out ready to achieve a new running goal of running 5 half marathons back to back. Training was going well and I found it easy to ramp up from 6km to 15km five days a week over the past few months. But I need to change things up, because there aren’t enough hours in a day to get all I want done.

When I started Asia News Weekly, I thought it would be good practice for me; however it has turned into a massive undertaking- and I love it. I love it so much, I decided to start a second podcast and that is starting to take off as well. This means that now I’m spending a lot of time working on these projects, but don’t really have the time to run the sometimes 2 hours I need.

So, the goal of making this run happen has to be put on the back burner, because I feel I need to ride the wave of ANW right now. Because of the time being put into production of these two podcasts, I am also going to cut back on vlogs. I will continue to upload videos on a regular basis, but I’m going to lift the requirement of posting every day so it doesn’t start feeling like a chore and remains fun.

As always, thank you for your support. Like I always say- stay true to yourself, and that’s what I’m doing. So until next time, let’s all be awesome.

Dunkin’ No More



Another store closes in my area – this time it’s a Dunkin’ Donuts. Seriously, I am very surprised this one closed down given what it has to offer. I guess it’s no longer time to make the donuts.

The Amazing SoMaek Prize



Korea’s default alcohols (beer and soju) are bloody cheap. A bottle of the standard soju (a distilled alcohol, similar to vodka and about 20% ABV) will usually run around W1,500 ($1.47). A 500ml can of beer can be as little as W2,050 ($2) on sale. However, as many who have traveled or lived in Korea will tell you, their taste leaves little to be desired for if one has a discerning palate.

SoMaek is the Korean drink mix that combines the two (SOju + MAEKju). Essentially, it’s the Korean version of an American boilermaker. Often the soju and maekju are poured directly into the consumer’s glass independently. However, on a recent trip outside where our favorite shooting game is located, we saw a Soju and Beer Mixer that does everything for you. I thought it a pretty ingenious idea and wonder how well it would work. It’s intriguing enough for me to buy in a store… but not enough for me to waste money on a shooting game.

What do you think of this gizmo?

Nambu Bus Terminal – The Walk and Talk #28



Most of the time Jo and I head out of the area on trips, we do so by bus. In fact, one of the reasons we love living where we do is the close proximity to Suwon Bus Terminal. Today, I venture into Seoul to take a look at the Nambu Bus Terminal Station, Nambu Bus Terminal, and the block around the bus station. I also spend some time explaining why it’s important to learn Hangul when traveling in Korea, since sometimes the English names and the Korean names don’t match up.

KAM Chats: Coming to Korea



This week on Korea and More Chats, Tom and I are discussing how we came to arrive in Korea to teach English. It’s something I’ve spoken about many times before, so this video blog is just a quick recap. However, I am interested in your story. Are you teaching abroad or have you taken a job overseas? Please share your story!

Korean Snacks: Doritos BOMB!



It’s Korean snack time again and today we have a unique offering. While the bag says Doritos, it really isn’t the same Doritos you’d find in the US. In Korea, Frito-Lay licenses the brand and concept to Lotte. So what makes this bag unique? Well it contains a bomb!

Let me explain the concept. The bag contains a healthy number of what tastes like nacho cheese Doritos, but mixed in a handful of bags that are seasoned with something that’s best described as horseradish.

The color, texture, and appearance of all the chips look the same so you never know which one you’re going to get until you pop it into your mouth.

It’s an interesting concept and could make for a fun drinking game. However, as a snack, it just doesn’t work. The horseradish chip really kills the mood – making it a very effective bomb – so it isn’t something you’d like eat while relaxing.

In your neck of the woods, do you have something like this?

Lose weight while walking in Korea!



Last year, Seoul published a study noting that 25% of its residents were obese and vowed to implement changes to improve overall health. It seems that one has now cropped up on subway maps. Check this out – the area map tells you how many calories you’ll burn when going to places around the subway station.