Why ISIS recruits in Asia, will Abe address Congress, what is Thai democracy and More


AUDIO VERSION

March 27, 2015

What’s the implication of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addressing the US Congress? Why is ISIS recruiting in Asia? And what exactly is Thai democracy? These stories and more are on the March 27th edition of Asia News Weekly.

Abe may address US Congress (1:06)

It’s no secret that Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his Liberal Democratic Party’s views on history have complicated relations in East Asia. In fact, despite the foreign ministers of the three nations meeting, the heads of state have yet to do so. Now, Abe is poised to address a joint session of the US Congress. Piin-Fen Kok, director of the China, East Asia and United States program at the EastWest Institute joins the podcast to discuss the possible ramifications.

Why is ISIS recruiting in Asia? (11:05)

The Islamic State is a cancer thrust upon the earth. In addition to attacks in the Middle East, the terrorist organization continues to reach out in attempts to recruit new members. Why is the terrorist organization setting its recruitment sights on Asia? Peter Chalk, Senior Political Scientist with the RAND Corporation discusses.

What’s Thai democracy? (18:34)

This past week, Thailand’s Prime Minister, Prayuth Chan-o-cha announced that while the country was moving towards democracy, it wouldn’t be like democracy like in the West. To get handle on what’s happening in the kingdom and where it may be headed, Joshua Kurlantzick, Senior Fellow for Southeast Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations joins the podcast.

State sponsored cyber attacks (24:31)

We know the story. Last year, Sony pictures was hacked by the Guardians of Peace. Many say that North Korea was ultimately behind the attack, others disagree. Then in December of 2014, North Korea experienced a massive net outage. Returning to the podcast is Lillian Ablon, Researcher with the RAND Corporation discussing state-level cyber attacks.

Regional Updates (28:09)

Perhaps the biggest story from the region this week was the passing of Singapore founding Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew. Also this week, the UN announced plans to open an office in Seoul to monitor human rights abuses in North Korea. Plus updates from Vanuatu, how 1,000 in India were nabbed for cheating, and who has the best whiskey in the world.

What’s the implication of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addressing the US Congress? Why is ISIS recruiting in Asia? And what exactly is Thai democracy? These stories and more on Asia News Weekly.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Japan’s new warship, China extends search to US, and Leung throws gauntlet


AUDIO VERSION

Thursday, March 26, 2015

If you’re on China’s anti-graft list, there may be no hiding. Japan’s naval forces just got an awesome new carrier. Plus, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive throws down the gauntlet against the pro-democracy movement.

China’s Anti-Graft Probe Extends to US

Chinese President Xi Jinping has been on a mission: take down anyone and everyone in the Chinese government who isn’t working above board. He’s targeted the weak and the powerful, and now he’s extending the anti-graft probe to the United States.

Japan’s new aircraft carrier

Who likes big boats? Japan does. With tensions in the East China Sea fluctuating between calm and stormy waters, it’s no wonder Japan wants to augment its maritime strength. Their latest aircraft carrier is a beautiful piece of machinery.

Leung throws down the gauntlet in Hong Kong

The Occupy Central movement lasted 79 days in Hong Kong, led mostly by students as they pursued a dream of universal suffrage – something they felt was rightfully theirs, but at odds with what Beijing had planned. Now the city’s Chief Executive, CY Leung, has issued a new challenge.

If you’re on China’s anti-graft list, there may be no hiding. Japan’s naval forces just got an awesome new carrier. Plus, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive throws down the gauntlet against the pro-democracy movement.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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What is the State of Asian Human Rights

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Eroding personal freedoms, political oppression, and what some say is an overall decline in democracy. These are all currently taking place in the region, but what is the state of human rights in Asia? That conversation is taking place in Asia… now.

March 25, 2015

Asia is home to 4.3 billion people or roughly 60% of the world’s population. It’s also home to cruel dictatorships like North Korea; China, who performs more executions than the world combined, and other nations that seem to have a revolving door on leaders, but what is the state of human rights in the region?

Phil Robertson, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Asia division joins the podcast to tackle that issue.

Do you live, work, or travel in Asia? Please weigh in on the topic by leaving a comment or replying through Facebook, or Twitter.

Eroding personal freedoms, political oppression, and what some say is an overall decline in democracy. These are all currently taking place in the region, but what is the state of human rights in Asia? That conversation is taking place in Asia… now.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

China executes terrorists, Russia says no THAAD, and Indonesian ISIS arrests


Audio version:

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Three executed in China for mass killing, Russia urges US not to deploy THAAD, and Indonesia continues to struggle with ISIS recruitment

China executes three connected to Kunming killings

Three men were executed in China on Tuesday for their roles in a deadly rampage in Kunming last year that left 31 dead.

Russia to US: No on THAAD

Saying it would threaten regional security, Russia urged the US not to deploy THAAD to South Korea. In a way they could be right.

Indonesia arrests ISIS suspects

On the heels of an Indonesian police officer who appears to have skipped out to join ISIS, Jakatra announces it arrested five more suspected of raising funds and recruiting for the terrorist organization.

Three executed in China for mass killing, Russia urges US not to deploy THAAD, and Indonesia continues to struggle with ISIS recruitment

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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ISIS in Hong Kong, Japan to aid US, Aquino in trouble


Audio Versions

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Monday, March 23, 2015

Daesh or as it’s better known, The Islamic State, stirs up trouble in Hong Kong, China may have to face both the United States and Japan in the South China Sea, and Aquino continues to be in trouble.

Daesh (Islamic State) recruits Hong Kongers

Unfortunately, it seems you can’t go a single day without hearing news about Daesh, or the Islamic State. Now it appears the terrorist organization has set their recruitment sights on Hong Kong.

Japan may assist United States in South China Sea

China has pretty much had its way with the South China Sea, bullying weaker ASEAN nations. Now as tensions slowly escalate, Japan appears to be stepping up commitment to the area.

Aquino continues to flounder

Two months after the bungled raid in Mindanao that left 44 Special Action Force members dead, Philippine President Benigno Aquino continues to face questions and criticism. Will he be able to turn things around or is this his downfall?

The Islamic State stirs up trouble in Hong Kong, China may have to face both the United States and Japan in the South China Sea, and Aquino continues to be in trouble.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Bolder China, Asian Bank Rate Cuts, and Global Cyber Security


AUDIO VERSION

Download the podcast here.

March 20, 2015

Are we seeing a bolder China in 2015? (0:40)

China continually uses the nine dash line to justify its claim on the region. Recently it announced plans to increase military spending and construct a second aircraft carrier. Scott Harold, Political Scientist and Deputy Director for the Center for Asia-Pacific Policy at the RAND Corporation joins the podcast to discuss China’s bold moves in 2015.

What do Asian Central Bank rate cuts mean? (7:42)

Last week, South Korea’s central bank cut interest rates… and it wasn’t alone. Others in the region did so including Thailand, China, and India. Curtis S Chin, inaugural Asia Fellow with the Milken Institute explains.

The State of Global Cyber Security (16:42)

Not too long ago, cyber thieves were able to steal $1 billion. North Korea has hacked several systems in South Korea and allegedly Sony Pictures. Now hackers have penetrated nuclear plants in South Korea and have put their plans online for all the world to see. Why are we seeing these kinds of attacks and what’s being done to stop them? Lillian Ablon, researcher at the RAND Corporation, discusses.

Regional Updates (26:01)

The UN High Commissioner for human rights said there were flagrant irregularities with the trial of former Maldives president Mohamed Nasheed. Why might that be? Plus lawyers in Thailand allege of police torture. Fighting continues in the Kokang region of Burma, Abe says reform is needed on the UN Security Council, and and update from Vanuatu.

Are we seeing a bolder China in 2015, will we seen any benefit to Asian central bank rate cuts, and what’s the state of global cyber security?

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Airline Settlement gives cash to trans-Pacific passengers


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Thursday, March 19, 2015

Did you fly to Asia? If so you could be getting some cash back. China adds more partners to AIIB, something US may not be too keen about. And finally, North Korea again shows its hand with Kaesong.

$40 Million up for grabs in Trans-Pacific Price-Fixing Settlement

If you flew across the Pacific sometime in the past fifteen years, you might have some cash coming your way as the result of a settlement with eight airlines. It all stems from a US investigation and anyone who flew across the Pacific as far back as 2000 may be eligible.

China’s AIIB is Taking Off

Once the UK announced it was joining China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the floodgates opened and other nations followed suit. What is an investment bank and why is the US upset about countries joining the AIIB?

Is Kaesong Proving to be a Bad Idea?

When will Seoul learn that doing business with North Korea at the Kaesong Industrial Complex brings nothing but headaches? It’s something that really makes you want to smack your head. Get the latest details on the current problem.

Did you fly to Asia? If so you could be getting some cash back. China adds more partners to AIIB, something US may not be too keen about. And finally, North Korea again shows its hand with Kaesong.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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What exactly is going on in Pyongyang?


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March 18, 2015

Kim Jong-un likes to rattle his saber. In 2013 the world went crazy, but what’s really taking place in North Korea? It’s one conversation taking place in Asia… now.

What’s is North Korea doing?

When turning our gaze to East Asia, one of the biggest question marks out there is the misnamed Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, or more commonly referred to as North Korea.

What exactly is going on in Pyongyang? Dr. Bruce Bennett, Sr. Defense Analyst with the RAND Corporation joins the podcast this week to shed some light on that topic.

After the podcast, please share your thoughts on what do you think we’ll see in 2015 from the young dictator?

What exactly is going on in Pyongyang? Dr. Bruce Bennett, Sr. Defense Analyst with the RAND Corporation joins the podcast this week to shed some light on that topic.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

NOTES

East Asia FMs meet as Philippines press China on SCS


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Wednesday, March 18, 2015

East Asia’s Foreign Minsters prepare to meet, showing the countries can actually work together, the Philippines continues to press China on land reclamation in the South China Sea, and Seoul says North Korea hacked it’s nuclear reactors.

East Asian Foreign Ministers set to meet

Their leaders might not be able to stomach being in the same room with one another, but that won’t stop the Foreign Ministers from South Korea, China, and Japan from meeting next week in Seoul.

Philippines Presses China on Sea

Last year, The Philippines took China to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague for its actions in the South China Sea. China ignored the calls for discussion, saying it didn’t recognize the court’s jurisdiction. Now, The Philippines is continuing to press the matter further.

Did North Korea hack South Korea once again?

Late last year, South Korea’s nuclear reactors came under cyber attack. Now, Seoul says North Korea is the culprit. Does this prove the north is better than South Korea at cyber war?

East Asia’s Foreign Minsters prepare to meet, showing the countries can actually work together, the Philippines continues to press China on land reclamation in the South China Sea, and Seoul says North Korea hacked it’s nuclear reactors.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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Vast destruction in Vanuatu; Where is Thailand headed? Philippines arrest militant leader


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Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Aid workers relay tales of complete devastation in Vanuatu. Four civilians in Thailand are headed to a military court. Plus the leader of a militant group is captured in the Philippines.

More bad news from Vanuatu

The old story of how things go from bad to worse, unfortunately seems to be running true in Vanuatu, where some aid workers are calling it the worst disaster they’ve seen.

Four Thais face military court

Ever since the junta assumed control of Thailand, one of the orders issued following the coup barred public gatherings. Now, four who defied that order aren’t facing trial in civil courts, but perhaps in a military court.

Philippine Army arrests splinter group leader

The Philippine Army can cross one more militant off its list. Mohammad Ali Tambako, founder and leader of the Justice Islamic Movement was apprehended. Will this lead to an end to the fighting that has killed 50,000 and displaced 80,000?

Aid workers relay tales of complete devastation in Vanuatu. Four civilians in Thailand are headed to a military court. Plus the leader of a militant group is captured in the Philippines.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

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