South China Sea Name Calling and More


AUDIO VERSION

Friday | May 8, 2015

China’s pot is calling the Philippines’ kettle black plus Seoul risks alienating others. These stories and more are on the May 8th edition of Asia News Weekly.

China trades jabs with Philippines

There may be no war in the South China Sea, but one can see how that may come to be. This past week, China has called the Philippines out for its land reclamation activities saying it goes against the 2002 Code of Conduct for the region, while ignoring its own activities. Host Steve Miller breaks down once conceivable course of action that may lead to conflict in the region.

Seoul continues to alienate Japan, now risks others

South Korea is a certainly a cinderella story when it comes from rising up fro the ashes of war. However, it’s continued attacks on Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and irrational fear that Japan is militarizing may actually hurt its critical and valid claims of historical revisionism.

The Weekly Brief

Rounding out this abbreviated version of the podcast, Miller points out what to watch for when North Korea’s Kim Yong Nam visits Russia this weekend during the WWII celebration. Plus additional stories on Japanese abductees in the DPRK, a manhunt in the Philippines, and what could set the stage for another political showdown in Taiwan.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Don’t go to North Korea; Arrests in Thailand and Hong Kong


AUDIO VERSION


Wednesday | May 6, 2015

North Korea detains three

Joo Won-moon, a South Korean student at New York University was arrested on April 22nd after crossing from the Chinese side of the Yalu river. In an interview with CNN, Joo said he was hoping his crossing and subsequent capture could have a good effect on the relationship between the two Koreas. What should the US and South Korea do next? Nothing.

Thai mass grave site owner possibly arrested

Thai police believe they have arrested a man responsible for the human trafficking camp where over thirty bodies were recently discovered. It’s the first big arrest in a case like this since the coup last year.

Hong Kong arrest made

A week ago, a group of six reportedly broke into a Hong Kong mansion, where they stole HK$2 million in goods and kidnapped 29-year-old Queenie Rosita Law. Now one man is in custody.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Sources

DIY Sound Booth


Since starting Asia News Weekly last year, I’ve been experimenting with many ways in which to record the podcasts. After moving the office around a few weeks ago, I started hearing a few echoes in the podcasts that I wasn’t too keen on. They were slight, but detracted from my experience so I wanted to correct that.

So I decided to build my own podcasting recording booth. In the video above, you’ll see how I spent roughly $377 to get everything in order.

Nepal updates, Thailand mass grave, and US tells China No


AUDIO VERSION:

Monday | May 4, 2015

The latest from Nepal as death tolls continue to climb and aid is stymied. In Thailand, officials find 32 decayed bodies. Despite it’s generous offer to use bases from reclaimed land in the South China Sea, the US tells China no.

PROGRAM NOTE: Due to the May 5th Children Day’s holiday and business trips The Asia Brief will only be released on Monday and Wednesday. An abbreviated Asia News Weekly will be released on Friday.

Nepal Quake

The death toll in Nepal has surpassed 7,200, with more than 14,000 suffering injuries. What problems are aid workers finding and what’s the latest on prospects for survivors are discussed.

Mass grave found in Thailand

Thailand officials uncovered a grisly scene over the weekend — a mass grave believed to be the remains of migrants from Myanmar and Bangladesh. Thirty-two graves were found in all with the cause of death yet to be identified.

US tells China No

Hot on the heels of international condemnation for its actions in the South China Sea, China fired back at its critics, telling them to mind their own business. China also offered up use of its reclaimed land bases to the US and others when the conditions were “right.” Something the US promptly rejected.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Sources

Destinations and tips for traveling in Asia


AUDIO VERSION


Saturday | May 2, 2015

This week on the Asia Now podcast, I sit down with several travel bloggers and pick their brains about where to go in Asia for summer vacations and how to get the most out of your trip.

We cover a wide range of topics from traveling the back roads of South Korea to climbing the amazing peaks of Pakistan. Looking for art? We’ve got that covered. Worried about traveling by yourself? That’s covered as well.

Guests

Christopher Staudinger  and Tawny Clark

Paula Nelms

Jaclynn Seah

Amber Hoffman

Jonathan Howe

Ahsan Jamal

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Thumbnail: Birkir Barkarson

What rules in the South China Sea, Abe in DC, and is Park a Lame Duck?


AUDIO VERSION:

Friday | May 1, 2015

Everyone else wants to follow the rule of law in the South China Sea, but does China? Has Abe’s forward looking statement wooed the world and left South Korea out in the cold? And what is the political state in South Korea? These stories and more are on the May 1st edition of Asia News Weekly.

Pray for Nepal (0:00)

Scenes of devastation continue to emerge from Kathmandu after a 7.8 magnitude earthquake leveled much of Nepal, killing and injuring thousands and affecting over 8 million people in the surrounding area. Host Steve Miller provides a quick overview of the science behind the earthquake and how you can contribute aid.

The Rule of Law and The South China Sea (2:29)

Last week a Chinese Coast Guard vessel shooed away a Filipino fishing boat from waters it had traditionally used. Then not only the United States, but those attending the recent ASEAN meeting said that restraint should be use in the region and adherence to the rule of law. Saying one supports the rule of law and should restrain one’s actions is great, but if China is playing by it’s own rules, how long can ASEAN members keep on that path? Scott Harold, Political Scientist and Deputy Director for the Center for Asia-Pacific Policy at the RAND Corporation returns with his analysis.

Does a forward-looking view negate addressing the past? (11:39)

Wednesday, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe addressed a joint session of the United States Congress. There was much speculation on how he would address history. Joining the podcast once again is Jonathan Miller, Fellow on East Asia with the EastWest Institute. What did Abe say and how will it play out at home and in East Asia? That’s discussed and more.

The State of South Korean Politics (21:04)

South Korean President Park Geun-hye just returned from her South American tour. She left amidst growing controversy over her administration’s handling of the Sewol Ferry rescue and a growing bribery scandal. With by-elections taking place this week in Seoul, will she be branded a lame duck as some suggest? Lee Tae-hoon, Publisher and Managing Editor of the Korea Observer discusses.

The Weekly Brief (25:46)

Rounding out the podcast in the Weekly Brief are a collection of additional stories from the region. After a long delay, Indonesia executed eight convicted drug smugglers, but what’s been the international fall-out? A Chinese activist remains in prison for “creating a disturbance.” Part of the evidence cited against Yu Shiwen is an interview with the Voice of America. Lawmakers in Thailand continue to peruse their new draft constitution, but the junta is placing some limits on how they talk about it. Plus alarming statistics from South Korea about teen suicide rates and how a Filipino Marine wants to sail into the South China Sea to protest China’s activities.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

SOURCES

South Korean – Japanese Relations


Audio Version:

Saturday | April 25, 2015

As South Korea and Japan prepare to mark the 50th anniversary of normalized relations between their two countries and the 70th anniversary of their liberation, diplomatic ties remain strained. Even now, after three years, President Park and Prime Minister Abe have yet to have a bilateral state-level meeting.

Why all the misgivings and just what are the issues preventing the United States’ key allies from burying the hatchet? For that, Jonathan Miller, Fellow on East Asia with the EastWest Institute joins the podcast.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

THAAD in Asia, China Sea Trouble, Cryogenics, and more



Audio version:


Friday | April 24, 2015

You’ve got to read between the lines when looking at this whole THAAD and Asia issue, the rhetoric continues in the South China Sea, and Thailand tries to pat itself on the back . These stories and more are on the April 24th edition of Asia News Weekly.

THAAD and Asia (0:58)

Will the US or won’t the US deploy THAAD to East Asia and specifically South Korea? The answer to that question really depends on who you talk to and if you believe what you hear. The United States has been painting North Korea in a light that makes it appear as an imminent threat, but is it? What could be the real motive for deploying THAAD on South Korean soil?

More Rhetoric in the South China Sea (6:22)

Last week I discussed China’s continued push in the South China Sea. That while no country in the world buys into the Nine-Dash Line, Beijing clings to rhetoric that it has absolute sovereignty in the area and can do what ever it wants, despite agreements in place with ASEAN members. US Senator John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, called the Chinese moves “aggressive,” but are we moving towards conflict?

Thailand’s Constitution Gets A Pat on the Back (10:16)

This week we finally saw the draft version of Thailand’s new constitution. Created by a 36-member Constitution Drafting Committee, there’s been a lot of criticism of the document that comes in at 130 pages. What are people taking issue with? Host Steve Miller explains.

Thai Baby Cryo-Preserved (13:41)

Making the news rounds this week is the story of Matheryn Naovaratpong, a two-year old girl from Thailand. She was diagnosed with a rare form of pediatric brain cancer. In an attempt to beat the odds, she underwent aggressive chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and numerous neurosurgeries, but ultimately it wasn’t enough. Miller speaks with Dr. Max Moore, President of the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, about how the child was cryogenically preserved.

The Weekly Brief (24:03)

There is of course a whole lot more taking place in Asia and here are just a few more highlights. First, Malaysian political cartoonist Zunar, who faces up to 43 years in prison for sedition,  says that despite that threat, he’s going to continue doing what landed him in hot water. Australia’s east coast was hit by a massive storm with cyclonic force winds. Plus Thailand announced one of the largest seizure of ivory ever, a Chinese robot you can control with your brain, and Japan might go to the moon.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

SOURCES

South Koreans Sue Japan, Court OKs reactor restart, and Justice fails Cambodia


Audio Version:


Thursday | April 23, 2015

Victims of Japan’s forced labor file a new class-action suit in South Korea, A Japanese Court okays the restart of nuclear reactors, and justice may evade survivors of the Khmer Rouge.

Korean Victims Sue Japanese Companies

Victims of Japan’s forced labor operations during the Second World War filed a class-action law suit against 72 Japanese companies in Seoul District Court this week. ”Deposits of back wages and welfare funds for Korean victims of forced labor amounting to tens of trillions of won sit idle in the Japanese Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications and the Japan Post Bank. We want the money we are entitled to,” the group’s spokesman said.

Japanese Court Okays Reactor Restart

The Kagoshima District Court has cleared Kyushu Electric Power’s Sendai nuclear power plant for restart. This means the company could activate the reactors as early as June despite widespread public opposition.

Justice in Cambodia?

Youk Chhang documented the horrors inflicted upon Cambodia in the Killing Fields by the Khmer Rouge. He and his team have contributed more than a million documents to a United Nations sanctioned tribunal tasked with punishing those responsible. However, all that now appears to be for naught.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Sources

Abe Honors Yasukuni, Hong Kong to debate Public Vote, and Pakistan Cyber Law


Audio Version:

Wednesday | April 22, 2015

Abe sends an offering to the Yasukuni Shrine which is sure to anger South Korea and China, Hong Kong is set to unveil its plans for electing a new Chief Executive in 2017, and Pakistan is chastised over its proposed cyber law.

Shinzo Abe Sends Offering to Yasukuni Shrine

It happens twice a year at Tokyo’s Yasukuni Shrine, festivals honoring Japan’s fallen who served under the Emperor until the end of World War II. Like clockwork, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe made a ritualistic offering, opting to not to tempt fate by making a personal visit with a trip to the United States next week. Will Seoul and Beijing respond as they usually do?

Hong Kong Unveils Political Reforms

Later today, Hong Kong will unveils its long awaited plan on how the city will pick its next Chief Executive in 2017. No surprises are expected today, as the guidelines will closely match those Beijing announced last year that ignited the Umbrella Revolution.

Pakistan Cyber Law Draws Criticism

Human Rights Watch, Privacy International, Digital Rights Foundation and others issued a joint statement expressing concerns over Pakistan’s proposed Prevention of Electronic Crimes Bill, declaring it a risk to the freedom of expression and privacy.

Keep up with news from the region by following Asia News Weekly on Facebook or Twitter. You can also send an email to the show with your comments, questions, and feedback. Just drop a line to podcast@asianewsweekly.net.

Subscribe to this and other podcasts at AsiaNewsWeekly.net. Subscribing is free and when you do, the next episode is delivered automatically to you.

Sources